Family Fun in St. Louis – Guest Post ft Jennifer Landis

We’re halfway through winter, and this is the time of year you might look forward to getting away from it. Are your friends heading to Florida or some tropical destination? Yeah, we know you’re jealous. But, maybe you have your own winter escape plans?

If you haven’t figured out a getaway destination or if you want to try something new, consider the Gateway to the West, St. Louis, Missouri. You will find history, adventure and a whirlwind of activities for your children. Here are seven things you can include for a unique and fun family vacation in St. Louis.Family Fun in St. Louis

The Touristy, but Very Worthwhile, Stuff

No trip to St. Louis would be complete without a visit to these iconic locations:   

1. Visit The Gateway Arch

The Gateway Arch is an iconic monument that sits on the bank of the Mississippi River. It holds its name as a representation for the city’s part in westward expansion in the United States during the 19th century.

Architect Eero Saarinen designed the arch in 1948, which was later built between 1963 and 1965. It’s a huge stainless steel sculpture that stands 630 feet tall as well as 630 feet wide. It appears as a giant door opening into the West.

You can even go to the top the structure if you are brave enough. Two trams, each with eight five-passenger cars, can carry you to a viewing platform at the top. It’s an amazing view riding up wherever you are seated, and once you reach the top — well, it’s breathtaking.

The arch is a national park, and it also has a museum, tourist area and welcome center. Consider it a gateway to the many activities St. Louis has to offer.Family Fun in St. Louis

Picture Source Pixabay

2. Take a Riverboat Cruise

Could there be a better way to tour a city than by relaxing aboard a riverboat cruise? Just sit back and enjoy a ride on a replica 19th-century paddle-wheel boat while taking in the views of modern-day St. Louis.

Ride along the Mississippi where Lewis and Clark began their historic journey, but feel confident that modern technology will keep you safe. There are a variety of hour-long sightseeing cruises, dinner cruises and specialty cruises to choose from.

3. Enjoy Busch Stadium

If you are sports fans and the weather is good, take in a game at Busch Stadium, home of the St. Louis Cardinals. You can see one of the best baseball teams at a stadium with one of the best views in the country. From nearly every vantage point, fans can see downtown St. Louis and the Gateway Arch.

The St. Louis Cardinals played first played in the new 47,000-seat Busch Stadium in 2006. The stadium also has many gathering and party areas, including the Budweiser Brew House and other restaurants and bars.Family Fun in St. Louis

Picture Source Pixabay

The Highly Kid-Friendly Activities

You certainly can spend a lot of money and get your money’s worth of fun in St. Louis, but there are also plenty of inexpensive and free kid-friendly things to do:

4. Go to a Museum                                                           

If the weather isn’t cooperating or if you want to give your kids some culture, take them to The Contemporary Art Museum, which always has free admission. The artists and exhibits vary throughout the year, so check online for specifics.

The museum also offers family-friendly, age-appropriate events such as Morning Play Dates and the Stroller Tour program. These give art lovers a chance to enjoy the museum with their children or to bring along little ones who might not be able to appreciate it yet. Family-friendly tours are accessible and more enjoyable when everyone has kids in tow.

5. See a Musical

The St. Louis Municipal Opera Theatre, affectionately known as “The Muny,” is America’s oldest outdoor amphitheater. The theater seats about 11,000 people and offers 1,450 free seats on a first-come, first-serve basis to anyone who would like to enjoy a show.

Be careful when making your plans as this not-for-profit outdoor theater is only open June through August.

6. Explore the Zoo

The St. Louis Zoo recently received recognition as America’s best zoo. Three million visitors per year enjoy free admission and the chance to see over 17,000 animals, some of them rare and endangered. The zoo is dedicated to wildlife conservation, saving the environment and to animal research and education.

Visiting the zoo is a great way to expose your children to animals they may never see in their natural environment. It also gives them awareness about the dangers these animals are in, due to human encroachment and destruction of their environment.

The zoo is sectioned based on which animals reside there:

  • River’s Edge: Rhinos, elephants, cheetahs and bears. Also a 33,000-gallon aquarium.
  • The Wild: Primates, penguins and polar bears
  • Discovery Corner: Kangaroos, insects and domestic pets and animals like goats and guinea pigs.
  • Historic Hill: Birds, reptiles and amphibians
  • The Red Rocks: Lions, leopards, giraffes and other four-legged animals.
  • Lakeside Crossing: Sea lions, seals and a stingray pool.

Enjoy safari tours, shows, feedings and other events for just a few dollars per person. The St. Louis Zoo is an all-day, family-inclusive and budget-friendly event everyone will enjoy.

7. Check out the Science Center

General admission to the St. Louis Science Center is free. Don’t let your kids tell you they aren’t interested in what they might think is a boring museum. They will learn while having fun as they enjoy science through interaction and demonstration.

Kids from one to eight years old can experience the Discovery Room where they can learn about outer space, play with water and interact with live animals. Older kids can learn about engineering and build real structures with limited supervision.

The Fun Awaits in St. Louis!

These are just some of the many activities, exhibits and amusements that can be found on a trip to St. Louis, so let your friends go back to Florida year after year. You and your family members may have different ideas of what fun is, but all of you will be able to find it in St. Louis, Missouri.Family Fun in St. Louis

Jennifer Landis is a nutrition nut, fitness fanatic, mindful and millennial mom. She loves tea, peanut butter, and red wine. Follow her blog – Mindfulness Mama – for more on mindfulness, parenting, and healthy living. You can also find Jennifer on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

*no remuneration has been received or given in return for hosting this guest post.

Family Fun in St. Louis

Is it worth visiting the Portland Childrens Museum?

The last stop on our two-week USA road trip last year was Portland. I’ve spoken before about why we wanted to visit Portland but one of the aims while there was to have some down time after a lot of driving and to spend some quality time together as a family, out of the car. Our plan was to find fun things to do in Portland with kids, so BattleKid could have some fun, and one things on our bucket list for the city was visiting the Portland Childrens Museum.

PORTLAND CHILDRENS MUSEUM

Now I’ll admit that I had never come across the idea of children’s museums until I started looking into things to do in Portland with kids. I did some searches and asked some lovely people in some travel Facebook groups I am a member of what there was to do in Portland with a toddler, and the children’s museum cropped up several times.

I also discovered that the childrens museum in Portland is located right beside Oregon Zoo in Washington Park, one of the other places on our Portland bucket list. We could combine the two and so a lovely family day out was decided.

Our first port of call was Oregon Zoo and we had a brilliant time there, in what has to be one of the best zoos we’ve ever visited. Once we had finished at the zoo, we did the short walk around to Portland’s Children Museum to see what it was all about.

The Portland Children’s Museum, as mentioned, is located in Washington Park on the old site of OMSI (Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, another place we visited while in Portland). It was founded in 1946 by Dorothy Lensch. Having moved to their new site in Washington Park, the museum was able to expand their programs and to open a school as well. The children’s museum now hosts more than 300,000 visitors each year.

We arrived after lunch, having refuelled in the zoo and we paid our tickets and entered what can only be described as a kids paradise.

We were first greeted by a crocodile on his back with his mouth open, the idea being you brushed his teeth. It’s a chance to get involved with your kids and to explain why brushing your teeth is important.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

From Mr Crocodile we moved onto the Water Works room and this was by far BattleKid’s favourite section. Having learned my lesson from visiting the water discovery section during our visit to OMSI the day before, I had brought spare socks for BattleKid to change into after this room. He spent ages in this room. We even had family fun at a table where you could build channels for a boat to run down. You could create both fast and slower moving channels and watch the effect of each by letting a toy boat run down them.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

After the water room we moved onto the Groundworks area and BattleKid had great fun trying to figure out how to work the diggers in the room. He spent ages filling buckets and moving “soil” from one end of the room to another. And there were even hard hats for the budding builders.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

There was also a pet hospital in the next room but BattleKid wasn’t interested so we moved on to the Treehouse. Although a small enough room, the treehouse was great and there was a tunnel for kids to crawl through. Next up was the theatre room. In here was a wall with coloured holes into which you placed an opaque tube which took on the colour of the light. This wall was awesome, and I could have played with it for hours, had I been let that is!PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

There was a Clay Studio in which classes were run at different times during the day. Kids can make something from clay and come back and collect their masterpiece at a later time.

The Maker Studio was BattleKid’s second favourite section. A room filled with things to use to create anything you like, he made a beeline for the hammering table. Safety glasses on, he grabbed a hammer and got banging. And because it’s a children’s museum, no one batted an eyelid at the noise he was making.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

There was every kind of craft supplies you can imagine for children to use. And it was evident they were by the large creation hanging from the ceiling!

Having hammered all the nails he had the energy for, we moved onto the Vroom Vroom section. And you guessed it, it had cars and trains for little ones to enjoy. There was a ramp in this room down which two cars could race. BattleKid and another little boy thoroughly enjoyed their races on this ramp. And when it was time to move on, there was an almighty tantrum from our boy!

Before making our way back to the exit we visited a room with slides, climbing walls and other games, all designed for some fun and exercise. BattleKid did really well on the climbing wall. We stopped by the gift shop on our way out and found a small Curious George teddy which we couldn’t leave behind.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

And even though we were finished inside, we weren’t quite finished. There was a piano for kids to get musical at, a train to drive and even a pretend wooden ambulance.PORTLAND-CHILDRENS-MUSEUM

Things to note if visiting the Portland Childrens Museum

  • The Portland Children’s Museum hours are from 9am to 5pm, 7 days a week.
  • Various activities are held during the day such as story time and pottery glazing. For full details see this section of their website.
  • There are different admission prices depending on whether you are a member or not. Non-members will pay $10.75 each, with under 1’s free. Museum members have free entry.
  • There is a Portland Children’s Museum free day, and this is generally the first Friday of each month, but can change.
  • Exhibits include Building Bridgetown, Clay Studio, Maker Studio, Water Works, The Market, Groundworks, Outdoor Adventure, Pet Hospital, The Theatre, Twilight Trail, Treehouse Adventure and Vroom Vroom.
  • The Outdoor Adventure is a large 1.3-acre outdoor space, although I cannot comment on it as we didn’t get a chance to visit it.
  • The museum has a café that serves nutritious meals and snacks. And you can use the café tablets to east your own food which is welcomed too.
  • Portland Children’s Museum is fully wheelchair accessible indoors and they also welcome families with members with disabilities and learning difficulties too.
  • There is parking in front of the museum in the public car park of Washington Park and costs just $4.00 per day, ideal if you plan to combine a visit to the zoo with the children’s museum as well.
  • The main toilets for the museum are located in the café at the front of the building.
  • There are stroller lockers located beside the toilets as the general policy is no strollers on the museum floor.

PORTLAND CHILDRENS MUSUEM - Is it worth visiting

So, is it worth visiting the Portland Children’s Museum? Absolutely. BattleKid had a brilliant time just being a kid and got to do things he wouldn’t normally such as play with water, dig “soil” and hammer nails. The museum is designed for kids between the ages of 0 and 12 years of age in mind, and it shows.

My only gripe is that it is the same entrance price for both adults and children. This is the first time I’ve come across this and felt there should have been a slightly smaller price for children’s entry. That said, if your child and you want to spend all day there, it’s worth it. Either way, a visit to the children’s museum in Portland is worth it, particularly if you combine it with a visit to Oregon Zoo next door.

Have you heard of, or come across children’s museums before?

Cath x

*We were not asked to write this review. All prices are correct at the time of writing this post (Jan 2018)

PORTLAND CHILDRENS MUSEUM

 

 

5 Things to Do in Missoula with a Toddler in Tow

Last year, as many of you know, we embarked on our biggest trip to date with BattleKid. It was a two-week USA road trip taking in the stunning Yellowstone National Park, smoky Missoula in Montana and the hip and vibrant city of Portland. Missoula is a place not many people will have heard of, us included before our trip, but is definitely worth a visit. And today I’m going to share with you 5 things to do in Missoula with a toddler in tow, should you be visiting yourself with a toddler or young kids. Continue reading “5 Things to Do in Missoula with a Toddler in Tow”

Our Visit to OMSI, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

Those of you who have read our USA Road Trip Holiday Diaries will know that we visited the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, or OMSI as it is known, while we were in Portland. This had been recommended to us and was on our Portland Bucket List. In this post I’ms haring with you our visit to OMSI as well as some useful information should you plan a visit there yourself.Our Visit to OMSI

The day after we arrived in Portland we decided to head there. I was quite excited as I had found out they had a Pompeii Exhibition on at the time of our visit to OMSI. BattleDad is a huge fan of Roman History and we’d love to visit Pompeii at some stage so to see the exhibition was an unexpected bonus. Our only reservation for our visit to OMSI was whether BattleKid would enjoy it. We need not have worried.

OMSI was founded in 1944 and was originally located in Washington Park at the site of the Portland Children’s Museum. However, as visitor number grew, and exhibitions got bigger, a new location was found for it on the east bank of the Willamette River.

The OMSI building is huge and houses no less than 3 auditoriums, a planetarium and numerous exhibition halls. They also have a submarine exhibit in the form of USS Blueback which was used for the film The Hunt for Red October before being towed to its current location at the pier adjacent to the main OMSI building.

Exhibition halls include the Featured Hall for special touring exhibits and the Turbine hall with exhibits for engineering, physics, chemistry and space travel. There is also the Life Sciences Hall which is all about biology, and includes talks and demonstrations with live animals. The Earth Science Hall features geology-oriented exhibits with two specialised laboratories. The Planetarium holds astronomy and laser light shows. And there is the Science Playground which we spent the most time in.

We arrived shortly after 9.30am after driving from our hotel and once we’d bought our tickets for the Pompeii Exhibition (including museum admission) and planetarium tickets, we made our way to the café for a quick cuppa and bite to eat. There I had my very first peanut butter and jelly sandwich, which was quite nice.

After we had eaten, we made our way upstairs to explore the exhibitions halls. As soon as we entered this area, BattleKid made a beeline for some giant cubes and dived right in. He and I had great fun at a giant pinball machine which was designed to educate children about food groups. Although he was too young to understand these, he still had fun trying to whack the balls!

Our Visit to OMSI - BattleKid falling into soft bricks
Giants soft cubes!
Our Visit to OMSI - BattleKid playing with the food pinball machine
Fun with the pinball machine

There were exhibits about recycling and garbage, exhibits about animals where we saw a Dire Wolf skeleton and saw live animals, and my personal favourite, an exhibit about fluorescent materials. This brought me back to my science background.

Our Visit to OMSI - Fluorescent Minerals at OMSI
Fluorescent Minerals
Our Visit to OMSI - A Dire Wolf skeleton
A Dire Wolf Skeleton

Next, we moved onto the Science Playground. And BattleKid had a whale of a time in the Science Playground. This area has been designed for families with newborn to children of six years of age. Fully enclosed and designed so that children are visible and secure at all times, it encourages children to discover through play and imagination. It has various experimental stations including

  • a stimulating infant area
  • a giant sandbox
  • a water area
  • a reading area and
  • a physical sciences area.

First stop was the water area of course. Only, we hadn’t quite planned for the wet floor. We had to take BattleKid’s shoes off as we entered but forgot to take his socks off. Wet feet were the result for spending so much time having splashy fun in the water area. It also meant he couldn’t really go into the giant sandbox as his feet were still wet and I didn’t fancy trying to get sand off his feet!

Our Visit to OMSI - BattleKid having fun with the water area at omsi
Fun in the water area

Next BattleKid had fun at the physical sciences area and was playing with other children, putting balls through holes and down ramps.

Our Visit to OMSI - BattleKid playing at the physical sciences area
Fun at the ball wall

We moved into one of the rooms off the main one and he and I did a fun game with magnetic balls in a maze. I ended finishing it when he got bored!Our Visit to OMSI - BattleMum helping BattleKid with a magnetic game

As were we getting close to our 12pm time for the astronomy show in the planetarium, we had to drag BattleKid away from the Science Playground. This was the first time BattleDad had been in a planetarium and he and I enjoyed it. It was great being shown some of the star constellations we can see above our house in Portugal, although I couldn’t tell you their names, apart from the Plough now. BattleKid got a bit restless before the end but stuck it out thankfully.Our Visit to OMSI - BattleKid pretending to be an astronaut at omsi

After the stars show we made our way to the Pompeii Exhibition. They allowed entry at timed intervals, which was to allow them to show the short video at the start of the exhibition. This gave some background about Vesuvius and Pompeii and the build up to that fateful night in 79AD.

Once you had watched the video, you were let into one of the main exhibition halls which featured artefacts from Pompeii including urns, gladiator clothing and weapons, mosaics and frescoes. Between this hall and a second one, there were over 200 artefacts on loan from the Naples National Archaeological Museum.Our Visit to OMSI - One of the Pompeii displays at omsi Our Visit to OMSI - Roman vases from Pompeii at omsi

It was amazing to see how well preserved some of the items were and the level of detail in them, particularly metalworks such as jewellery and coins. After the main hall, we were led upstairs where there was another short video. However, it was advised that it was unsuitable for young children and we were allowed to skip this video and were let into the next exhibition hall by a member of staff. #

The video we didn’t see was a 4D one in which you could experience the fury of Vesuvius in an immersive theatre with vivid sights, sounds and shaking ground. I think it was very helpful of OMSI to allow families with younger children to skip this part.

The last room of the exhibition had more artefacts and also body casts of people from Pompeii. It was a sobering place, especially seeing the body casts of children. We didn’t stay long in this room with BattleKid.Our Visit to OMSI - The Pompeii Exhibition was at omsi during our visit

Before we finished our visit to OMSI we visited the gift shop which is well stocked, and BattleKid got a little space ship souvenir with his name on it for his room. Overall, we thoroughly enjoyed our visit to OMSI and highly recommend it. Had we known how good the Science Playground was going to be we might have booked a later showing in the planetarium and let BattleKid enjoy it even more. I am so glad it was recommended to us and made it onto our Portland Bucket List.

Visitor information for OMSI

  • There is a large car park adjacent to the OMSI building with a charge of $5. WE were there early on a Wednesday morning in September and there was plenty of parking.
  • OMSI is served by public transport. The OMSI/SE Water Ave Station connects to the MAX, bus and Portland Streetcar lines.
  • The museum is open from 9.30 to 5.30 Tuesday to Sunday. It is closed on Mondays.
  • The café is open from 8.30 to 5.30 Sunday, Tuesday-Thursday and from 8.30 to 8.00 on Friday and Saturdays.
  • Submarine tours are from 9.50 to 4.30 and you can even do sleep overs!
  • Entry to the museum costs $14.50 for an adult and $9.75 for a child (3-13 years).
  • Entry to the submarine costs $6.75. For the Empirical Theatre, which we didn’t go to, an adult costs $7-8.50 and a child is $6-6.50. Entry to the Planetarium costs between $5.75 and $7.50.
  • The Pompeii Exhibition ended in October. To see up-and-coming events, please visit the Events page of the OMSI website.

Our Visit to OMSI

We can highly recommend visiting OMSI if you are ever in Portland, Oregon. There is plenty to see and do for children and adults alike. Children will particularly like the Science Playground, so give yourself plenty of time in there.

Cath x

*Prices are correct at the time of writing.

**We were not asked to write this review.Our Visit to OMSI

Our Visit to OMSI

Apartment in Astoria – New York AirBnB Review

Last September, the Battle Family finally visited New York for the first time. I had originally booked an apartment in Lower Manhattan via AirBnB but just two months before we were due to fly out, our host got in touch to say the booking was cancelled as they no longer had the apartment. Cue panic. We needed to secure somewhere and fast. I went back onto AirBnB and scoured ‘Book Now’ places to find us somewhere, and reasonably priced, and stumbled upon a fabulous apartment in Astoria.

Continue reading “Apartment in Astoria – New York AirBnB Review”